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TruPlenish shake

De TruPlenish Shake is een van de belangrijkste onderdelen van het TruHealth gewichtsbeheersing systeem. Het is een plantaardig, (zonder synthetische toevoegingen!) complete maaltijd vervanger vol vitaminen, mineralen, probiotica, Glyconutriënten en meer dan 20 gram eiwit. Door het hoge-vezelgehalte houdt u langer het gevoel voller te zijn. TruPlenish komt in een heerlijke chocolade en vanille smaak. Met TruPlenish shake kunt u gemakkelijk dagelijks een maaltijd of snack vervangen terwijl het u in staat stelt om gemakkelijk te verminderen uw calorie-inname zonder in te boeten voedingsbehoeften. Zodra u uw doelen heeft bereikt, kunt TruPlenish blijven gebruiken in uw dagelijkse maaltijden zodat u uw nieuwe gewicht en verbeterde vorm van het lichaam kan behouden.

De TruPlenish Shake:*

  • Helpt bij het verbeteren van uw lichaamscompositie door middel van het behoud van de spiermassa
  • Ondersteunt gezonde gewichtsbeheersing
  • Bevordert gezond, natuurlijk gewicht te verliezen, voor een gezonder, slanker lichaam
  • Vermindert gevoelens van honger en stimuleert verzadiging
  • Bevordert een gezonde spijsvertering
  • Helpt je er beter uit te laten zien en te voelen
  • Vormt nieuwe en gezonde gewoonten
  • Geschikt voor veganisten / vegetariërs
  • Omvat niet de ingrediënten die zijn geproduceerd met behulp van biotechnologie
  • glutenvrij
  • Vrij van soja
  • Vrij van zuivel of zuivel afgeleide ingrediënten
  • Vrij van MSG
  • Zonder kunstmatige zoetstoffen
  • Vrij van kunstmatige kleurstoffen
  • Zonder kunstmatige smaakstoffen

*Wanneer genomen in combinatie met de TruHealth Fat-Loss System.

TruPlenish van Mannatech

De TruPlenish shake verschaft een basis glyconutrienten, vitaminen en mineralen, omega-3 vetzuren, probiotica en antioxidanten en 20 gram plantaardige eiwit per portie.

Algemeen Voordelen:

  • Zie er beter uit en voel je beter
  • Vorm nieuwe en gezonde gewoonten
  • Biedt, aanhoudende, stabiele en gebalanceerde energie
  • Het is een evenwichtige maaltijdvervanger voor geavanceerde voeding en wellness
  • Biedt makkelijk te verteren plantaardige eiwitten die efficiënt voor het lichaam te verwerken zijn
  • Bevordert een gezonde spijsvertering

Gezonde gewichtsbeheersing voordelen:

  • Hoog vezelgehalte dat ervoor zorgt dat u een vol gevoel heeft [5 gram vezels, 20% DV]
  • Ondersteunt gezonde gewichtsbeheersing
  • Vermindert gevoelens van honger en vergroot het verzadigings gevoel
  • Helpt bij het veranderen van de lichaamscompositie door behoud van spiermassa
  • Bevordert gezond gewicht-verlies voor een gezonder, slanker lichaam
  • Helpt bij het verhogen de stofwisseling
  • Ondersteunt het behoud van spiermassa

Comprehensive system for optimal nutrition
High in protein [20 g, 40% DV/serving] The protein powder component of TruPLENISH powder includes a rich array of amino acids, including the nine amino acids that must be supplied in the diet (essential amino acids) (E).  The protein component is:

  • 17.1% glutamic acid
  • 11.0% aspartic acid
  • 8.6% leucine (E)
  • 8.1% arginine
  • 6.0% lysine (E)
  • 5.7% phenylalanine (E)
  • 5.5% valine (E)
  • 5.2% serine
  • 4.8% alanine
  • 4.8% isoleucine (E)
  • 4.4% proline
  • 4.2% tyrosine
  • 4.2% glycine
  • 3.8% threonine (E)
  • 2.4% histidine (E)
  • 1.7% methionine (E)
  • 1.3% cysteine
  • 1.1% tryptophan (E)

Features a blend of plant-based proteins
High in fiber [5 g, 50% DV/serving] Quick and complete
Each serving provides baseline amounts of:

  • vitamins
  • minerals]
  • glyconutrients
  • omega-3 fatty acids
  • probiotics
  • prebiotics
  • antioxidants
  • Made with a natural sweetener

Functional ingrediënts

  • Acacia senegal gum

    Acacia senegal gum is the dried exudate—a complex, loose aggregate of sugars [arabinose, galactose, rhamnose] and hemicelluloses—of Acacia senegal. Also known as gum arabic, it is commonly included in cosmetics as a fragrance ingredient or as a suspending and emulsifying agent 1, 2. Acacia gum is generally considered to be a nontoxic material when used topically 2.

  • Aloe vera extract (inner leaf gel powder)

     Aloe vera extract inner leaf gel powder includes Manapol®, a polysaccharide found in aloe vera gel. A unique ingredient exclusive to Mannatech, Incorporated, Manapol is extracted from fresh, washed and filtered gel by a specialized extraction method that yields insoluble fibers and stabilized, high molecular weight (MW) soluble fibers rich in long-chain mannose sugars—beta-(1-4)-acetylated polymannans. Many attribute the benefits of topically and orally-applied aloe vera gel to its polymannan content. The MW of over 20% of Manapol is >800,000. It also contains the monosaccharide sugars glucuronic acid, glucose, galacturonic acid, xylose, galactose, glucosamine, fucose, rhamnose and arabinose, and small amounts of protein, calcium, potassium and sulfate 1,2,3.

  • Alpha-linolenic acid (from flaxseed and chia seed)

    Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is an 18-carbon polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid that is common in some vegetable oils, flaxseeds, walnuts and chia seeds. An essential fatty acid, ALA cannot be made by the body and thus must be obtained in the diet. The body can use ingested ALA to make small amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two omega-3 fatty acids essential for normal growth and development, particularly the eyes and brain, and for cardiovascular health1.

    Flax seeds are the seeds of the common flax, or linseed plant, Linum usitatissimum. Flax seeds contain high levels of lignans, polyphenolic compounds that have been shown to be beneficial to human health. They also contain a significant amount of ALA 1. Flax seeds appear to be well-tolerated, and there is long-standing historical use of them in dietary supplements.

    Chia seeds are produced by a mint family plant, Salvia hispanica. Chia has been a traditional food for people living in Central and South America for centuries. Chia seeds are comprised of 15-25% protein, 30-33% fats, 18-30% fiber and vitamins and minerals 2. The seeds high protein and healthy fat composition (60% ALA and 20% omega-6 linoleic acid) accounts for its growing popularity among health-conscious consumers.

  • Amylase

    Amylase is an enzyme produced by the salivary glands and the pancreas that can break down starch, glycogen and related polysaccharides into simple sugars 1. Amylase derived from widely utilized fungi and bacteria, such as Aspergillus niger and Bacillus subtilis, is approved for use as a food enzyme by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2.

  • Arabinogalactan (from Larix spp. wood)

    Arabinogalactans are a class of long, densely branched high-molecular weight polysaccharides extracted for commercial uses from the bark of the Eastern and Western Larch trees, Larix larcinia and Larix occidentalis.Their monosaccharide constituents include galactose, arabinose, glucose and mannose 1. Larch arabinogalactans are considered a good source of prebiotic soluble dietary fiber 2,3. Small amounts of arabinogalactans can be found in some food plants, including corn, carrots, tomatoes, pears, wheat and red wine 4.

    A human double-blind, placebo-controlled trial indicates that intake of 1.5 grams of a larch arabinogalactan can enhance the antigenic response to a bacterial (tetanus) and viral (flu) challenges in healthy subjects 5. Both Ambrotose powders provide > 1.5 grams of this larch arabinogalactan/day.  Two human double-blind, placebo-controlled trials indicated that higher doses of  this arabinogalactan (4.5 grams) can enhance the response to a bacterial (pneumococcal) challenge 6,7.

    Larch arabinogalactans are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) (21CFR172.610).

  • Biotin (from baker’s yeast)

    Biotin is a water-soluble B complex vitamin required for many reactions involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats and proteins 1. Biotin is found in many foods such as liver, egg yolk, green vegetables and whole grains.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 300 μg biotin for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Blueberry (fruit)

    Blueberry. The fruits of the flowering plant, Vaccinium myrtilloides, are native to North America, where they have been cultivated since the early 19th century. Blueberries are sold fresh, frozen, canned, puréed or dried. They are also used to make foods such as jams, pies and muffins 1. They are an excellent source of vitamin K and manganese, as well as a source bioflavonoids, vitamin C and dietary fiber 2, 3.

  • Broccoli (flower/stalk)

    Broccoli. The leaves and stem of broccoli, Brassica oleracea italica, are an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C. Broccoli also contains the additional nutrients protein, fiber, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid and biotin, as well as bioflavonoids 1. Many of these nutrients have antioxidant properties.
    Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are biologically inactive, sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the biologically active metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine 2. Broccoli has a high glucosinolate content compared to other cruciferous vegetables, and broccoli extracts have a particularly high concentration of sulforaphane 3, 4.

  • Broccoli sprouts

    Broccoli sprouts, the tender sprouted seedlings of the edible green plant, Brassica oleracea. Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family (Brassicaceae, also called Cruciferae). Members of this family, particularly broccoli and cauliflower, are well recognized for their health benefits. Extensive attention has thus been devoted to a unique component of cruciferous vegetables, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are biologically inactive, sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the biologically active metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine 1. Compared with other cruciferous vegetables, broccoli has a high glucosinolate content, and broccoli sprouts are particularly rich, having about ten times the content found in the mature floret of the plant.

  • Calcium (from red algae (Lithothamnium spp.))

    Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the human body. Over 99% of total body calcium is found in the bones and teeth. The remaining 1% is found throughout the body in blood, muscle and the intracellular fluid. Calcium is used for muscle contraction, blood vessel constriction and relaxation, the secretion of hormones and enzymes, and nervous system signaling. A constant level of calcium is needed to be maintained in the body in order for these processes to function properly. The body gets the calcium it needs through food and by being extracted from bones. Calcium-rich foods include dairy products and dark, leafy greens. For dietary calcium, vitamin D is important and recommended for optimal calcium absorption through the intestine. Calcium extraction from bones occurs when dietary calcium is insufficient and can lead to weakened bone structure 1.
    Many individuals in the U.S. consume inadequate amounts of calcium. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 1,000 mg calcium for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Red algae (Lithothamnium spp.) are species of algae that are rich in the essential minerals calcium and magnesium and contain a number of trace minerals including manganese, selenium and zinc 2. Lithothamnium species belong to the family of coralline algae, Corallinaceae. They are harvested off the coasts of Britain and France to be used as a source of calcium (calcium carbonate) and magnesium (magnesium carbonate) in dietary supplements.

  • Carrot (root)

    Carrot. The edible roots of the carrot plant, Dacus carota, are one of the world’s leading vegetable crops. Carrots are a member of the parsley family, Apiaceae or Umbelliferae, and are one of the richest vegetable sources of vitamin A and beta-carotene 1. Carrots are also a good source of vitamin K and a source of vitamin C, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, manganese, dietary fiber and potassium 2. Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.

  • Cellulase

    Cellulase is an enzyme produced by fungi, bacteria and other microscopic organisms. Production of cellulase by intestinal bacteria helps with the digestion of plant cellulose and other beta-glucans, which are indigestible by human enzymes 1. Cellulase derived from widely utilized fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma longibrachiatum, is approved for use as a food enzyme by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  • Chromium (from baker’s yeast)

    Chromium is an essential trace element that plays an important role in normal blood sugar regulation. Sources of dietary chromium include high-bran cereals, meats, poultry, fish and some beers and red wines. Only small amounts (<2.5%) of dietary chromium are absorbed through the intestine 1.
    No adverse effects have been associated with chromium intake from food or supplements 1. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 120 μg chromium for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.

  • Cocoa

    Cocoa. The seeds of the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao, can be used to make cocoa powder, cocoa butter and cocoa extracts. The cacao tree is native to the Americas, and today the vast majority of cacao is grown in West Africa 1. In foods, cocoa is used as a flavoring agent. The combination of cocoa powder and cocoa butter make up pure, unsweetened chocolate. Cocoa contains the alkaloids caffeine and theobromine, along with tannins and flavonoid compounds that have antioxidant activity 2. Cocoa extract is approved for use as a food additive by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 3.

  • Copper (from baker’s yeast)

    Copper is a mineral that occurs naturally in many foods and is present in small amounts in drinking water. Contributors of dietary copper include organ meats, seafood, nuts, wheat bran cereals and whole grain products. Copper is a component of multiple enzymes and is involved in numerous biochemical reactions in human cells, such as the reduction of molecular oxygen, the regulation of gene expression, mitochondrial function/cellular metabolism and the absorption, storage and metabolism of iron 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 2.0 mg copper for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    The risk of adverse effects resulting from excess intake of copper from food, water and supplements appears to be very low in adults, but may be more likely in young children. Excess copper intake can lead to gastrointestinal disturbances and possible liver damage 1.

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

  • Cranberry juice concentrate (fruit)

    Cranberry juice concentrate. The cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon, grows wild in eastern North America and is commonly associated with the holiday of Thanksgiving. Cranberries are consumed as whole berries (fresh or frozen) or as the primary ingredients in cranberry juice and cranberry sauce. Fresh cranberries are rich in fructose and the acids citric, quinic and benzoic 1. They are fairly low in calories and are also a source of fiber, bioflavonoids, potassium and vitamin C 2. When compared with a variety of other common fruits, cranberries contain the largest amount of phenolic antioxidants 3.

  • Elderberry

    Elderberry species are members of the Sambucus genus of flowering plants. This genus occurs in temperate and subtropical regions around the world. Many species are widely cultivated for their ornamental leaves, flowers and fruit. The European elderberry fruit (Sambucus nigra L.) is rich in sugars, organic acids, anthocyanins and polyphenols 1.

  • Folate (from baker’s yeast)

    Folate is a water-soluble B complex vitamin that is used in the human body for synthesis of nucleic acids and amino acids. Food sources of folate include dark green leafy vegetables, citrus fruits and juices, legumes and liver.

    Folate is well tolerated in amounts found in fortified foods and supplements. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 400 μg folate for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Fructose

    Fructose, also known as levulose, is a monosaccharide sugar that occurs naturally in honey and a number of fruits. It is used as a flavoring and sweetening agent in foods. Fructose is the sweetest sugar, sweeter than the other monosaccharide sugars glucose and sucrose 1. It is approved for use as a food additive by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration 2.

  • Guar gum

    Guar gum is a high viscosity polysaccharide (galactomannan) obtained from the seed of the guar plant (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba or C. psoraloides) 1.
    . The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers guar gum to be Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) when used in foods, typically as a thickener (21CFR184.1339).

  • Gum tragacanth

    Gum tragacanth comes from the stems and branches of the flowering plant Astragalus gummifer. The raw gum is made up of a mixture of two polysaccharides. Monosaccharide constituents include galactose, arabinose, xylose, fucose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid 1. Gum tragacanth has been approved for use in pharmaceuticals in the U.S. since 1820 and in foods since 1925 2. Most gums are believed to be largely degraded in the colon 3. Test tube studies have demonstrated that gum tragacanth can be digested by a number of bacteria that inhabit the human colon, including the beneficial Bifidobacteria species 4,5. Gum tragacanth is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is commonly added to foods (21CFR184.1351).

  • Invertase

    Invertase is an enzyme produced in the small intestine that breaks down the disaccharide sucrose into the monosaccharides glucose and fructose 1. It is typically derived from yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for commercial use. Invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is approved for use as a food additive by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2.

  • Iodine (from baker’s yeast)

    Iodine is an essential element required by humans for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Therefore, normal functioning of the thyroid gland, a gland actively involved in the regulation of metabolism, requires iodine. Humans obtain iodine from their diets. Iodine deficiency is rare in industrialized countries such as the United States due to the enrichment of table salt with iodine. Under normal conditions, the absorption of dietary iodine is greater than 90 percent 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 150 μg iodine for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

  • Iron (from protein blend)

    Iron is an essential mineral that primarily functions in the movement of oxygen from the environment to the tissues. There are two forms of dietary iron: heme and non-heme. Sources of heme iron include meat, fish and poultry. Sources of non-heme iron include beans, lentils, flours, cereals and grains. Iron levels are tightly regulated in the human body, mainly by controlling the amount of iron absorbed from food. The proportion of dietary iron absorbed is determined by the iron requirement of the individual; more iron present in the body means less iron is absorbed through the intestine. Heme iron is more easily absorbed than non-heme iron 1. The risk of adverse effects from food sources of iron is low. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 18 mg iron for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels. The protein blend in TruPLENISH is comprised of pea protein, flax protein, flaxseed and chia seed.

  • Kale (leaf)

    Kale is a cruciferous vegetable that is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. It is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K and manganese, as well as a source of dietary fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B6, calcium, potassium and copper 1. Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.
    Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine 2. Kale has a moderate to high glucosinolate content when compared with other cruciferous vegetables 3.

  • Lactase

    Lactase is an enzyme that breaks down lactose, a disaccharide found in milk, into the monosaccharides glucose and galactose. In humans, lactase is located on the membranes of epithelial cells lining the small intestine. Lactose intolerance is caused by the absence or deficiency of this enzyme in the intestinal system1. Lactase derived from certain strains of yeast is approved for use as a food enzyme by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2.

  • Lactobacillus acidophilus

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a strain of lactic acid-producing bacteria that is naturally found in the human gastrointestinal tract. It is commonly found in fermented milk products, such as yogurt, and can also be consumed as a dietary supplement. Lactobacillus acidophilus is considered a probiotic, beneficial bacteria that help maintain the health of the intestinal tract and aid in digestion. Probiotics also assist in nutrient absorption and help control the amount of harmful bacteria in the gut. Orally, Lactobacillus species are usually well-tolerated, the most common side effect being a mild case of flatulence that tends to subside as consumption continues 1.

  • Lipase

    Lipase is an enzyme that digests fat-soluble molecules called lipids. It is found in many plants, milk, dairy products, bacteria, molds and animal tissues. In the human digestive system, lipase is made by the pancreas and secreted into the intestines to help break down dietary fats 1. Lipase derived from animal tissue and certain nontoxic and nonpathogenic fungi is approved for use as a food enzyme by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2.

  • Magnesium (from marine mineral complex and algae)

    Magnesium is a mineral necessary for human life. Magnesium is essential to all living cells, but nearly 50% is found within the bones, where it plays a major role in bone and mineral homeostasis. Magnesium is also important for many cellular reactions, such as energy generation, cell membrane stabilization and protein activation. Food sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, nuts, meat, starches and milk1,2. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 400 mg magnesium for adults and children 4 or more years of age. RDIs, which are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals, serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels. Supplementation with magnesium is appropriate for many, as more than half of the U.S. population consumes less than 245 mg/day. When ingested as a naturally occurring substance in foods, magnesium has not been demonstrated to exert any adverse effects. However, mild gastrointestinal disturbances have been observed with excess magnesium intake from nonfood sources 2.

    Marine mineral complex , derived from brine (mineral-rich sea water) from Israel and the Mediterranean Basin, contains numerous minerals, particularly magnesium and calcium.

    Red algae (Lithothamnium spp.) are species of algae that accumulate minerals in their leaves (fronds) throughout their lifespan. When harvested, Lithothamnium spp. fronds are rich natural sources of the essential minerals calcium and magnesium, and measurable levels of 72 other trace minerals. Intake of a calcium and magnesium-rich supplement from Lithothamnium spp. has been shown to support bone health3.

  • Manganese (from baker’s yeast)

    Manganese is an essential nutrient that activates a number of enzymes involved in the formation of bone and in amino acid, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Dietary manganese can be found in grain products, vegetables and beverages such as tea. Only a small percentage of dietary manganese is absorbed through the intestine 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 2.0 mg manganese for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

  • Molybdenum (from baker’s yeast)

    Molybdenum is an essential trace element that functions as a cofactor for a number of enzymes in the body, some of which are involved in the metabolism of amino acids and nucleotides. The molybdenum content of plant foods varies depending upon the soil content in which they are grown. Legumes, grain products and nuts are major contributors of molybdenum to the diet. Dietary molybdenum is efficiently absorbed through the intestine 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 75 μg molybdenum for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

  • Niacin (from baker’s yeast)

    Niacin is a water-soluble vitamin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide. Niacin is a precursor to the most central electron carrier substances in living cells, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP), thus functioning in many metabolic pathways 1. Foods that contain niacin include beans, liver, fish, poultry and cereal grains.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 20 mg niacin for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Pantothenic acid (from baker’s yeast)

    Pantothenic acid, also known as vitamin B5, is an essential B complex vitamin that is a component of coenzyme A (CoA), a molecule that is involved in the metabolism of fat, carbohydrates and proteins 1. Rich food sources of pantothenic acid include chicken, beef, potatoes, oat cereals, tomato products, liver, kidney, egg yolk, broccoli and whole grains. In commercial supplement products, pantothenic acid is available as calcium or sodium D-pantothenate or as pantothenol. Pantothenic acid is frequently used in combination with other B vitamins in vitamin B complex formulations.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 10 mg pantothenic acid for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Pea protein

    Pea protein. Peas, the small spherical seeds or seed-pods of the legume Pisum sativum, have been consumed as food for thousands of years, beginning with Chinese cultures as far back as 2000 B.C. Peas can be used as a source of protein in dietary supplements, containing almost as much protein by weight as eggs 1. Pea protein is highly digestible and a good source of essential amino acids, including lysine and the branched chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine 2.

  • Protease

    Proteases are protein-digesting enzymes. While they occur naturally in all organisms, proteases in supplements are typically obtained from safe, non-pathogenic fungi. Orally administered protein-digesting enzymes can be detected in human blood, at least to some extent, in their intact, biologically active form 1.

  • Riboflavin (from baker’s yeast)

    Riboflavin is a water-soluble vitamin, also known as vitamin B2, which is involved in numerous metabolic processes and energy production in the body 1.Good dietary sources of riboflavin are milk, eggs, enriched cereals/grains, meats, liver and green vegetables. Riboflavin is commonly found in multivitamin and vitamin B complex preparations.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 1.7 mg riboflavin for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    The limited capacity of humans to absorb orally administered riboflavin limits its potential for harm. No adverse effects associated with riboflavin consumption from food or supplements have been reported 1.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Selenium (from baker’s yeast)

    Selenium is a trace mineral found in soil, water and some foods. The selenium content of food varies depending on the selenium content of the soil where the animal was raised or the plant was grown. Selenium is an essential element in several metabolic pathways and functions largely through its association with proteins, known as selenoproteins. Known biological functions of selenium include defense against oxidative stress and regulation of thyroid hormone action. Absorption of selenium is efficient with more than 90 percent of selenomethionine, the major dietary form of the element, being absorbed through the intestine 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 70 μg selenium for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

  • Sodium

    Sodium is the primary cation (positive ion) in extracellular fluids in humans. Sodium is necessary for regulating the water content of blood and other bodily fluids and is transported across cell membranes to regulate the transmission of nerve impulses and heart activity. Salt (sodium chloride) is the primary form of sodium in the diet. Other forms of sodium found in food include monosodium glutamate, sodium benzoate, sodium nitrite, sodium bicarbonate and sodium citrate. The amount of dietary sodium that is absorbed through the intestine is approximately 98% 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Daily Reference Value (DRV) of 2,400 mg sodium for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). DRVs are a set of dietary references for energy-producing nutrients, cholesterol, sodium and potassium that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. DRVs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    It is well-recognized that the current intake of sodium for most individuals in the United States exceeds recommended doses. The most common adverse effect seen with high sodium intake is an increase in blood pressure 1.

  • Stevia extract (leaf)

    Stevia extract is derived from the leaves of the plant, Stevia rebaudiana. Stevia extracts are used as natural sweeteners and as dietary supplements in a number of countries, including the United States 1. Much of the sweetness of stevia leaves is attributed to the presence of glycosides, including rebaudioside A, which is about 300 times sweeter than sucrose (sugar). Stevia also contains tannins and phytosterols, such as beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol 2.

  • Tart cherry

    Tart cherry, or sour cherry, is the fruit of the tree Prunus cerasus. Tart cherries, which are a favorite wild fruit in Spain and Portugal,1 are rich in numerous antioxidant polyphenols 2 and anthocyanins 3.

  • Thiamin (from baker’s yeast)

    Thiamin is a water-soluble B-complex vitamin, also known as vitamin B1. It functions as a coenzyme in the metabolism of carbohydrates and branched-chain amino acids 1. Dietary sources of thiamin include beef, pork, breads, seeds and whole grain cereals. Dietary thiamin is minimally absorbed through the intestine.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 1.5 mg thiamin for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6 2.

  • Tomato (fruit)

    Tomato is the fruit of the plant, Lycopersicon esculentum, and a member of the Nightshade family, Solanceae. Cultivated tomatoes vary in size from cherry tomatoes, 1–2 cm in diameter, to beefsteak tomatoes, 10 cm or more in diameter. Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A and well-known for their lycopene content, an important antioxidant nutrient 1. Ripe (red) tomatoes contain 3 to 4 times as much vitamin A as mature green tomatoes 2. Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamin K and a source of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate and manganese 3.

    This ingredient can also be found in the following products:

    • Ambrotose AO® Capsules
    • MannaBears Gummies
    • Optimal Support Packets
    • Phyt•Aloe® Capsules
    • TruPLENISH™ Vanilla Nutritional Supplement Shake

    Expand References

  • Vitamin A (as beta-carotene)

    Vitamin A, also called retinol, is a fat-soluble vitamin that is essential for humans. Adequate intake is important for normal vision and immune function. Dietary vitamin A can be provided as both preformed vitamin A and provitamin A carotenoids that are precursors to vitamin A. Preformed vitamin A is abundant in animal-derived foods like liver, kidney, eggs, and dairy products. Carotenoids, like beta-carotene, are found in darkly colored fruits and vegetables. Preformed vitamin A is efficiently absorbed through the intestines, while carotenoids may either be absorbed through the intestines intact or cleaved to form vitamin A prior to absorption. The proportion of beta-carotene converted to vitamin A decreases as beta-carotene intake increases, limiting the risk of vitamin A toxicity 1.
    Dietary preformed vitamin A and provitamin A carotenoids have vitamin A activity that can be expressed as retinol activity equivalents (RAEs) or international units (IU). In the U.S., 1 RAE is equal to 3.33 IU vitamin A. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 5,000 IUs vitamin A for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

    Beta-carotene, also called provitamin A, is a member of a group of plant-produced compounds called carotenoids, which serve as precursors to vitamin A. Beta-carotene is a potent antioxidant. The ultimate source of all vitamin A is from the carotenes, and beta-carotene has the highest vitamin A activity 1. Beta-carotene is particularly abundant in orange vegetables and fruit, and may be directly added to foods as a vitamin supplement 2.
    Carotenoids may either be absorbed through the intestines intact, or be cleaved to form vitamin A prior to absorption. There is no Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for beta-carotene or other provitamin A carotenoids. However, dietary provitamin A carotenoids have vitamin A activity that can be expressed as retinol activity equivalents (RAEs). The RDA for RAEs is 900 µg/day for men and 700 µg/day for women 3. Beta-carotene supplementation in humans is likely safe over long periods of time.

  • Vitamin B12 (from baker’s yeast)

    Vitamin B12 is an essential water-soluble vitamin that is commonly found in a variety of animal foods such as fish, shellfish, meat and dairy products. Synthetic vitamin B12 is frequently used in combination with other B vitamins in vitamin B complex formulations and added to supplements and fortified foods such as cereals. An adequate supply of vitamin B12 is essential to maintain healthy nerve cell and red blood cell function, as well as for folate utilization. The average fractional absorption of vitamin B12 from food by healthy individuals is approximately 50 percent, while synthetic vitamin B12 has increased bioavailability 1.
    No adverse effects have been associated with vitamin B12 intake from food or supplements in healthy individuals 1. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 6 μg vitamin B12 for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6

  • Vitamin B6 (from baker’s yeast)

    Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids and the release of glucose from glycogen 1. Major sources of vitamin B6 include fortified, ready-to-eat cereals; mixed foods (including sandwiches) with meat, fish or poultry as the main ingredient; white potatoes and other starchy vegetables; and non-citrus fruits. Vitamin B6 is frequently used in combination with other B vitamins in vitamin B complex formulations.
    Vitamin B6 is generally considered safe in adults and children when used appropriately at recommended doses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 2.0 mg vitamin B6 for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It is an excellent source of the essential B vitamins, including folic acid, niacin, biotin, pantothenic acid, riboflavin, thiamin and vitamin B6

  • Vitamin C (from acerola fruit extract)

    Vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid, is an essential water-soluble vitamin found mainly in fruits and vegetables, particularly in citrus fruits such as oranges. Vitamin C functions as a reducing agent and thereby demonstrates potent antioxidant activity. Vitamin C deficiency can lead to the disease scurvy, which involves the deterioration of elastic tissue, demonstrating the important role of ascorbic acid in the synthesis of connective tissues such as collagen in bones 1. Dietary vitamin C is efficiently absorbed through the intestine.
    Vitamin C is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (21CFR182.8013). The U.S. FDA has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 60 mgs vitamin C for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Acerola extract is obtained from the fruit of the small tree, Malpighia glabra or Malpighia punicifolia. Acerola is grown in tropical regions of the Americas. The fruit is known for being one of the richest natural sources of vitamin C and also contains vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and polyphenols, such as anthocyanins. Acerola fruit extract acts as an antioxidant, likely due to the presence of some of these nutrients 2. Most acerola fruit is processed into fruit products, such as jams, jellies and juices, or added to dietary supplements as a source of vitamin C 3.

  • Vitamin D (from mushroom)

    Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that exists in two physiologically relevant forms, ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) and cholecalciferol (vitamin D3). Ergocalciferol is synthesized by plants and mushrooms, while cholecalciferol is synthesized by humans in the skin when it is exposed to ultraviolet-B (UVB) rays from sunlight. Some foods may also be fortified with vitamin D, such as milk and breakfast cereals. The current average daily intakes of vitamin D for Americans are well below suggested adequate intakes 1, and much of the world’s population is deficient in this important vitamin 2.
    The main function of vitamin D is to regulate serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations within the normal range by enhancing the efficiency of the small intestine to absorb these minerals. By influencing the absorption of calcium, vitamin D helps to form and maintain strong bones and teeth 3,4. Vitamin D supplementation helps prevent falls and maintain physical performance in the elderly 4,5. Adequate vitamin D intake may also be important for maintaining immune health 6,7, nervous system health 8, may help improve mood during the winter months 9,(10) and improve overall quality of life (11).
    Vitamin D is generally well tolerated at recommended doses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 400 international units (IUs) vitamin D for adults and children 4 or more years of age. RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (% DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    According to the Endocrine Society’s Vitamin D Clinical Practice Guidelines, published in June 2011, individuals who are at risk for vitamin D deficiencies should as their physician to have their blood tested for the vitamin D metabolite [25(OH)D]. For individuals with blood 25(OH)D levels <75 nmol/L, higher amounts of vitamin D intake are suitable: children ages 1–18 may need 600–1,000 IU daily,adults >18 age may need 1,500–2,000 IU vitamin D daily (12).

  • Zinc (from baker’s yeast)

    Zinc is an essential trace element necessary for the functioning of approximately 100 different enzymes in the body. It plays a vital role in many biological processes, such as the maintenance of protein structure, the regulation of gene expression and the metabolism of hormones. Zinc is abundant in red meats, certain seafood and whole grains, and many breakfast cereals are fortified with zinc. The proportion of dietary zinc absorbed is determined by the amount of zinc already present in the body, with higher absorption occurring when zinc status is low 1.
    Zinc is regarded as relatively safe and generally well tolerated when taken at recommended doses. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Reference Daily Intake (RDI) of 15 mg zinc for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). RDIs are a set of dietary references for essential vitamins and minerals that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. RDIs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.
    Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, also known as brewer’s yeast, is a yeast often used for baking or brewing. It contains proteins, B vitamins, vitamin C, minerals and amino acids.6 2.

Formulation

  • Brown rice protein

    Brown rice protein. Brown rice (or “hulled rice”) is unmilled or partly milled rice, Oryza sativa. The process that produces brown rice removes only the outermost layer, the husk, of the rice kernel, which is the least damaging to its nutritional value and avoids the unnecessary loss of nutrients that occurs with further processing. Brown rice contains approximately 8% proteins, which include the amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine, leucine, valine, lysine, methionine and cystine, isoleucine, histidine, tryptophan and valine 1.

    This ingredient can also be found in the following products:

    • TruPLENISH™ Vanilla Nutritional Supplement Shake

    Expand References

  • Natural flavor(s)

    Natural flavors are oils or extracts containing the flavoring constituents derived from a variety of sources. The natural flavors in Mannatech’s products may be derived from spices, fruits or fruit juices, vegetables or vegetable juices, herbs, bark, buds, roots, leaves or similar plant materials, or dairy products. The significant function of such ingredients in foods or supplements is for flavor rather than nutrition (21CFR501.22).

Functional

  • Potassium

    Potassium is the primary intracellular cation (positive ion) in humans, required for the normal functioning of all cells in the body. It is necessary for regulating the transmission of nerve impulses, muscle contraction and blood flow. Fruits and non-grain vegetables are rich in potassium. Potassium citrate and potassium phosphate are the two forms of potassium naturally found in foods, while potassium chloride is the form most commonly added to processed foods and used in dietary supplements. In healthy individuals, approximately 85% of dietary potassium is absorbed through the intestine. Most potassium leaves the body through the urine; however, heat exposure and exercise can cause increased loss of potassium via sweat 1.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established a Daily Reference Value (DRV) of 3,500 mg potassium for adults and children 4 or more years of age (21CFR101.9). DRVs are a set of dietary references for energy-producing nutrients, cholesterol, sodium and potassium that are considered amounts sufficient to meet the daily requirements of healthy individuals. DRVs serve as the basis for calculating the percent daily value (%DV) amounts found on dietary supplement and food labels.

  • Raspberry (fruit)

    Raspberry. Red raspberries, Rubus idaeus, are the major type of raspberry grown in the United States. They are a popular dessert fruit, included in foods such as pies, baked goods, sherbets and jams, as well as used for the production of certain liqueurs and wines 1. Raspberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, manganese and dietary fiber, and they contain a number of bioflavonoids, such as quercetin, that demonstrate antioxidant activities 2, 3.

  • Spinach (leaf & stem)

    Spinach. The leaves of the spinach plant, Spinacia oleracea, are a popular garden vegetable, widely cultivated throughout the world. While some spinach is consumed fresh, the majority is processed as canned or frozen1. Fresh spinach is an excellent source of vitamins A and K, a good source of folate and a source of vitamin C and manganese 2. Spinach also contains flavonoid compounds, such as quercetin and myricetin, which demonstrate antioxidant activities 3.

  • Strawberry (fruit)

    Strawberry. Strawberries are the world’s leading berry-type fruit, although technically they are not a true fruit but a pseudocarp, literally translated as “false fruit” 1. They are an excellent source of vitamin C and a source of bioflavonoids, such as quercetin, which demonstrate antioxidant activities 2, 3.

  • Glutenvrij
  • Van nature glutenvrij
  • Geschikt voor vegetariërs en veganisten
  • Geen genetisch gemodificeerd DNA
  • Vrij van soja of soja-afgeleide ingrediënten
  • Vrij van zuivel of zuivel afgeleide ingrediënten
  • Vrij van MSG
  • Vrij van kunstmatige kleurstoffen
  • Zonder kunstmatige smaakstoffen
  • Vrij van kunstmatige zoetstoffen
  • Zonder bewaarmiddelen
  • Lage glycemische
  • Bevat natuurlijke ingrediënten
  • Geschikt voor iedereen van negen jaar en ouder
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